Symbols

Back

Arpeggiate

A chord with notes played in rapid succession, usually ascending, each note being sustained as the others are played. Also called a "broken chord".

Back

Dal Segno

Tells the performer to repeat playing of the music starting at the nearest segno. This is followed by al fine or al coda just as with da capo.

Back

Da Capo

Tells the performer to repeat playing of the music from its beginning. This is followed by al fine (lit. "to the end"), which means to repeat to the word fine and stop, or al coda (lit. "to the coda (sign)"), which means repeat to the coda sign and then jump forward.

Back

Dotted Note

A dot placed beside a note increases the value of the original note by one half. Thus, a dotted half note is equal to three quarter notes. Any note can be inreased by half its value by adding a dot.

Back

Crescendo

A dynamics marking indicating that the musical passage is to grow louder

Back

Diminuendo

A dynamics marking indicating that the musical passage is to grow softer

Back

Crescendo

A dynamics marking indicating that the musical passage is to grow louder

Back

Accent Mark

A sign that indicates that the note above or below it receives more stress than the surrounding notes

Back

Flat Sign

An accidental that, when placed in front of a note, lowers the pitch of tha tnote by a half step

Back

Sharp Sign

An accidental that, when placed in front of a note, raises the pitch of that note by a half step

Back

Natural Sign

An accidental that, when placed in front of a note, cancels(for that note) any existing sharp, flat, double sharp, or double flat

Back

Marcato

The note is played somewhat louder or more forcefully than a note with a regular accent mark (open horizontal wedge).

Back

Mordent

Rapidly play the principal note, the next higher note (according to key signature) then return to the principal note for the remaining duration. In most music, the mordent begins on the auxiliary note, and the alternation between the two notes may be extended.

Back

Slur

A curved line, extended over two or more notes of different pitch, used to indicate a smooth, connected style of playing or singing

Back

Tie

A curved line connecting two notes of the same ptch, used for creating notes of long duration

Back

Engage Pedal

Tells the player to put the sustain pedal down.

Back

Staccato

Staccato means "detached" in Italian, A Staccato Mark (a dot) tells you to play a note as though it's alone, to play it shorter with emphasis and put more silence before and after it.